To Uplift and Inspire: Refuge from the Storm

Haha oops. I mixed up yesterday and today’s posts! Oh well, feel inspired today. It’s Wednesday, we all need an extra something to get us through the week. This week’s talk comes from the Sunday Afternoon session of conference, titled Refuge from the Storm and given by Elder Patrick Kearon. One thing I love about my church is that we are a church of action, of doing. It is good to speak and believe, yes–but truly believing requires action. So, with no further ado, my favorite snippets!

 

“There are an estimated 60 million refugees in the world today, which means that “1 in every 122 humans … has been forced to flee their homes,” and half of these are children. It is shocking to consider the numbers involved and to reflect on what this means in each individual life.”

“As members of the Church, as a people, we don’t have to look back far in our history to reflect on times when we were refugees, violently driven from homes and farms over and over again.” (This is a reference to the Mormon Pioneers, leaving the east US).

“he Savior knows how it feels to be a refugee—He was one. As a young child, Jesus and His family fled to Egypt to escape the murderous swords of Herod.”

“Truly, “pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this, To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction” and to “look to the poor and the needy, and administer to their relief that they shall not suffer.””

“The reality of these situations must be seen to be believed. In winter I met, amongst many others, a pregnant woman from Syria in a refugee transit camp desperately seeking assurance that she would not need to deliver her baby on the cold floors of the vast hall where she was housed. Back in Syria she had been a university professor. And in Greece I spoke with a family still wet, shivering, and frightened from their crossing in a small rubber boat from Turkey. After looking into their eyes and hearing their stories, both of the terror they had fled and of their perilous journey to find refuge, I will never be the same”

“We must be careful that news of the refugees’ plight does not somehow become commonplace when the initial shock wears off and yet the wars continue and the families keep coming.”

“If you are asking, “What can I do?” let us first remember that we should not serve at the expense of our families and other responsibilities, nor should we expect our leaders to organize projects for us. But as youth, men, women, and families, we can join in this great humanitarian endeavor.”

“Begin on your knees in prayer. Then think in terms of doing something close to home, in your own community, where you will find people who need help in adapting to their new circumstances.”

“The Lord has instructed us that the stakes of Zion are to be “a defense” and “a refuge from the storm.” We have found refuge. Let us come out from our safe places and share with them”

“For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love.”

“Being a refugee may be a defining moment in the lives of those who are refugees, but being a refugee does not define them. Like countless thousands before them, this will be a period—we hope a short period—in their lives.”

“This moment does not define them, but our response will help define us.”

““Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.” In the name of Jesus Christ, amen.”

Thanks for reading,

Cozybooks

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